Friday Favourites | Non-Fiction

Friday Favourites was originally hosted by Kibby on Something of the Book, but is now hosted by Geeky Galaxy. The rules are:

  • There is a list of bookish topics
  • Write up your post, however you feel, following the topic. Your list can be a list of 2 or a list of 50, whatever you feel like. Go wild!
  • Don’t want to write your favourites? I fully support a list of least favourites too!

This week’s topic is Non-Fiction. I typically don’t read a lot of nonfiction, but there have been a few that have caught my eye over the last year. So here are the 5 non-fiction books that I want to read in 2021. Now, I typically need an audiobook for non-fiction so these are only ones that have that option available.

Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women that a Movement Forgot by Mikki Kendall

This one was circling around Booktube last summer and it sounds really interesting. I was really interested in it, but the line for the hold at the library was months long. I may try again over the summer (when I’m done school).

Goodreads Synopsis:

Today’s feminist movement has a glaring blind spot, and paradoxically, it is women. Mainstream feminists rarely talk about meeting basic needs as a feminist issue, argues Mikki Kendall, but food insecurity, access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. All too often, however, the focus is not on basic survival for the many, but on increasing privilege for the few. That feminists refuse to prioritize these issues has only exacerbated the age-old problem of both internecine discord and women who rebuff at carrying the title. Moreover, prominent white feminists broadly suffer from their own myopia with regard to how things like race, class, sexual orientation, and ability intersect with gender. How can we stand in solidarity as a movement, Kendall asks, when there is the distinct likelihood that some women are oppressing others?

All Boys Aren’t Blue by George M Johnson

I’ve heard nothing but amazing things about this book and I just haven’t gotten around to picking it up.

Goodreads Synopsis:

In a series of personal essays, prominent journalist and LGBTQIA+ activist George M. Johnson explores his childhood, adolescence, and college years in New Jersey and Virginia. From the memories of getting his teeth kicked out by bullies at age five, to flea marketing with his loving grandmother, to his first sexual relationships, this young-adult memoir weaves together the trials and triumphs faced by Black queer boys.

Both a primer for teens eager to be allies as well as a reassuring testimony for young queer men of color, All Boys Aren’t Blue covers topics such as gender identity, toxic masculinity, brotherhood, family, structural marginalization, consent, and Black joy. Johnson’s emotionally frank style of writing will appeal directly to young adults.

The Fire Never Goes Out: A Memoir in Pictures by Noelle Stevenson

This one is different than the rest on the list. It doesn’t have an audio, but it is a graphic novel and I’ve enjoyed non-fiction graphic novels without an audio before. I want to read this one because I loved Nimona and I would love to learn more about this author

Goodreads Synopsis:

From Noelle Stevenson, the New York Times bestselling author-illustrator of Nimona, comes a captivating, honest illustrated memoir that finds her turning an important corner in her creative journey—and inviting readers along for the ride.

In a collection of essays and personal mini-comics that span eight years of her young adult life, author-illustrator Noelle Stevenson charts the highs and lows of being a creative human in the world. Whether it’s hearing the wrong name called at her art school graduation ceremony or becoming a National Book Award finalist for her debut graphic novel, Nimona, Noelle captures the little and big moments that make up a real life, with a wit, wisdom, and vulnerability that are all her own.

Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body by Roxane Gay

Really it’s easier to just say anything by Roxae Gay! But this was the first one to come on my radar. I enjoy fiction books that tackle mental health and weight/body issues, so I figured this one would be the best one to start with of hers.

Goodreads Synopsis:

From the New York Times bestselling author of Bad Feminist: a searingly honest memoir of food, weight, self-image, and learning how to feed your hunger while taking care of yourself.

“I ate and ate and ate in the hopes that if I made myself big, my body would be safe. I buried the girl I was because she ran into all kinds of trouble. I tried to erase every memory of her, but she is still there, somewhere. . . . I was trapped in my body, one that I barely recognized or understood, but at least I was safe.”

In her phenomenally popular essays and long-running Tumblr blog, Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and body, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as “wildly undisciplined,” Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she explores her past—including the devastating act of violence that acted as a turning point in her young life—and brings readers along on her journey to understand and ultimately save herself.

With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and power that have made her one of the most admired writers of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to learn to take care of yourself: how to feed your hungers for delicious and satisfying food, a smaller and safer body, and a body that can love and be loved—in a time when the bigger you are, the smaller your world becomes.

In the Dream House by Carmen Maria Machado

I found out about this one because it was on a list of LGBTQIA+ books and I had briefly heard about the author’s other book, Her Body and Other Parties.

Goodreads Synopsis:

For years Carmen Maria Machado has struggled to articulate her experiences in an abusive same-sex relationship. In this extraordinarily candid and radically inventive memoir, Machado tackles a dark and difficult subject with wit, inventiveness and an inquiring spirit, as she uses a series of narrative tropes—including classic horror themes—to create an entirely unique piece of work which is destined to become an instant classic.

Those were the 5 non-fiction books that have audiobooks that I would like to read this year. Have you read any of them? Which one do you think I should start with first? Comment below.

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